Popular
Points
24K
PhotographyWeAre

We love sharing great photography

PhotographyWeAre is a community devoted to photography, providing a space for people to share their passion for all things photography.

Launch date: June 2019
Combined FreeTimePays following: 101K


Community sponsors:

Green open spaces
17 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

West Park in Wolverhampton, a Victorian gem!

Back in March 2019, I noticed on Google Maps while in Wolverhampton, there was a park nearby called West Park. So I went to check it out before getting the train back to Birmingham. Opened as the People's Park in 1881. It is surrounded by Park Road West and Park Road East. There is a statue of Charles Pelham Villiers in the park. He was the local MP at the time (he served 63 years).

Related View community

West Park in Wolverhampton, a Victorian gem!





Back in March 2019, I noticed on Google Maps while in Wolverhampton, there was a park nearby called West Park. So I went to check it out before getting the train back to Birmingham. Opened as the People's Park in 1881. It is surrounded by Park Road West and Park Road East. There is a statue of Charles Pelham Villiers in the park. He was the local MP at the time (he served 63 years).


West Park, Wolverhampton

My visit to West Park, Wolverhampton was on the 24th March 2019. At the time I got the train from Birmingham to Wolverhampton. Initially to see the orange West Midlands Railway signs at Wolverhampton Station, then for another walk around the City. I ended up at the Costa Coffee on Dudley Street, when I was looking at Google Maps for somewhere to walk, and take photos, when I noticed West Park on the map. I went for a walk around West Park, then when I left, I passed the Molineux home of Wolverhampton Wanderers FC, where I saw the statue of Sir Jack Hayward. I also passed the University of Wolverhampton campus on the walk back to the station (saw one of the Wolves in Wolverhampton sculptures from the 2017 trail).

Now for some history of the park taken from the Wikipedia page (link above). The park opened on the 6th June 1881 as the People's Park. The site that was chosen was formerly the Wolverhampton Race Course, or Broad Meadows, owned by the Duke of Cleveland. In March 1879, Alderman Samuel Dickonson invited landscape gardeners to complete the layout of the park. The winner was Richard Hartland Vertegans of Chad Valley Nurseries, Edgbaston, Birmingham. The park includes ornamental lakes, a Bandstand, which was presented by the towns long-standing MP, Rt. Hon. Charles Pelham Villiers in May 1882 (his statue was moved to the park in 1931). It is now Grade II listed. A conservatory opened was opened in July 1896 by the widow of former Mayor Alderman Samuel Dickinson. Commemorative flower beds were laid out in 1911 for the Coronation of King George V, and the same was done in 1937 for King George VI. The park was added to the Heritage National Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in 1986. A team room was refurbished in 2005 with help from a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

 

And now onto my visit from March 2019. Approaching the Gates between Park Road West and Park Road East. They are Grade II listed. They were installed in 1880. All the walls and gates that surround the park are part of this listing. The architects were Bayliss, Jones and Bayliss. Made of Ashlar on a brick base with cast-iron railings and gates. Park Road West is to the left and Park Road East to the right.

The entrance path from the Park Road East gates, heading into the park.

On the left was the gatehouse, which is now the Ranger Station.

A large open field of grass not far from the Park Road East entrance.

Not far from there was this brick sculpture of a Victorian Sewer. It was built for the Wolverhampton Fiesta of the 1970s. Made of brick.

The West Park Tea Rooms were to the right.

The Bandstand. It is Grade II listed dating from 1882. It was made by McDowell Stevens & Co of Glasgow. Originally made of a Cast-iron on brick base. It used to have a cast-iron roof, but this was replaced with fibreglass in 1976.

At the time the bandstand had fences around it (I think it has since been restored and reopened since I was there). The bandstand is in an Octagonal structure on brick base.

Seen on the other side of the West Park Boating Lake was the Conservatory. It is a Grade II listed building. It dates to 1896 and was designed by Dan Gibson. It was made of Brick with terracotta dressings. It also had a timber superstructure on iron stanchions.

Another view of the Conservatory over the boating lake, as families walked past it. I did not go on that side of the lake, and wasn't sure if it was open or not.

This view from the West Park Boating Lake towards the Conservatory.

Several views of the West Park Boating Lake. All the usual Canada geese and ducks in here.

There was an island in the middle of the lake, where I assume that all the birds would go.

This side of the lake towards the Pavilion.

A close up look at the Pavilion from the other side of the lake.

There was some Greylag geese in the lake at the time.

Now for a look at the Statue of Charles Pelham Villiers. It was looking quite weathered at the time of my visit.

Years of rain, wind and snow have done this to the statue.

The statue is Grade II listed as the Villiers Statue. It was made in 1878 and was of the town's long standing Member of Parliament, Rt.Hon. Charles Pelham Villiers. It was sculpted by W.Theed the younger.

The statue was made of Ashlar. It was placed on a high plinth which supports a figure in 19th century dress and was holding scroll, against draped stand.

The statue was moved from it's original position in Snow Hill, Wolverhampton in 1931, to this site in West Park. Villiers was born in 1802 and died in 1898 at the age of 96 years. He was MP for Wolverhampton for a record 63 years! He had the seat of Wolverhampton from 1835 until 1885, then Wolverhampton South from 1885 until his death in 1898.

Heading out of the park, saw this Bridge over the lake. It is Grade II listed and dates from 1880. It was made with Cast-iron with ashlar abutments and piers. I did not cross it, as I wanted to get more views of the Villiers statue (see above).

Saw this fingerpost on the way out of the park. It had directions to the Devon Road exit to the left and the Connaught Road exit to the right. Also to the playground and bandstand. Tennis court and boating lake.

The path near the Lansdowne Road exit / entrance, which I would take to leave the park.

The noticeboard at the Lansdowne Road entrance. Also with the parks opening hours.

The gates at Lansdowne Road. This was the exit that I took to Park Road East. I then headed down to Park Crescent, and back to the Wolverhampton Ring Road.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Green open spaces
17 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Mary Stevens Park in Stourbridge, in what was the Studley Court estate

Back in July 2019 I wanted to ride the Stourbridge Shuttle again, and while in Stourbridge, I noticed on a map that htere was a park in walking distance from the Town Centre. This was Mary Stevens Park. The park opened to the public in 1931. It was named after the late Mary Stevens, wife of local businessman Ernest Stevens who donated the land for the creation of a park around 1929-30.

Related View community

Mary Stevens Park in Stourbridge, in what was the Studley Court estate





Back in July 2019 I wanted to ride the Stourbridge Shuttle again, and while in Stourbridge, I noticed on a map that htere was a park in walking distance from the Town Centre. This was Mary Stevens Park. The park opened to the public in 1931. It was named after the late Mary Stevens, wife of local businessman Ernest Stevens who donated the land for the creation of a park around 1929-30.


Mary Stevens Park, Stourbridge

I found another park on Google Maps, while in Stourbridge, in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley (back in July 2019). This was Mary Stevens Park. I went to the Costa Coffee in the Ryemarket Shopping Centre, for the second time in 6 years. And was looking at somewhere to walk to before going back to Stourbridge Town Station. I noticed a park that wasn't that far away to walk to. Leaving the Ryemarket Shopping Centre, I headed along Worcester Street, until I got to the main gates on Heath Lane.

In 1929 after the death of his wife Mary, local industrialist and philanthropist Ernest Stevens gave land to the town of Stourbridge to develop a park. He purchased the Studley Court estate and house from the nuns of the St. Andrews Convent, with the intentions of creating a park. It would be named Mary Stevens Park and opened to the public in 1931. The park has a lake called the Heath Pool, there is also a Bandstand, tennis courts, bowling green, outdoor gym, a cafe and a children's play area.

Mr Stevens donated the gates at the entrance to the park.

One plaque dating 1929 reads:

This park was given by
Ernest Stevens
in Memory of his wife
Mary Stevens
a noble woman
who went about doing good,
to be for all time a place
of rest for the weary.
of happiness for children,
and of beauty for everyone.

The second plaque reads:

The entrances were
constructed and given by
the donor of the park
Ernest Stevens, Esq., J.P.
of Prescot House
Stourbridge.

The gates seen from the main entrance on Heath Lane. Just beyond a roundabout and at the end of Worcester Street. The Gates, Piers and Railings are Grade II listed. They date to 1930. They are made of fine ashlar piers with wrought-iron gates and railings in Neo-Georgian style.

There is bollards around the entrance. Cars can drive to the car park, but cant go onto the main path into the park. the roundabout ahead has a big tree in the middle.

Heading into the park, trees line the main path beyond the bollards. Was also flower beds on the right. The main path is called the Queen's Drive. It was opened on the 23rd April 1957 by HM the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh. Who toured around in an open top Land Rover at the time.

The Mary Stevens Park noticeboard and map from the main path, The car park is behind. Also has a bit of history on it to the left. The sign mentions that Ernest Stevens legacy was not just to leave a park for local people, but to preserve open green space for all to enjoy. Queen Elizabeth II also made a visit to the park in 1957.

The wonderful flower beds to the right of the main path.

The Stourbridge War Memorial was to the left of the main path. It was erected in memory of the lives lost during the First World War. It was originally set up outside of the public library in Stourbridge in 1923. It was designed by Ernest Pickford and unveiled by the Earl of Coventry on the 16th February 1923. It is Grade II* listed.

It was later moved to it's current location in Mary Stevens Park in 1960. There is a bronze statue on top of a woman. The listing says it dates to 1920 and was moved here in 1966. Made of fine ashlar with metal, probably bronze, plaques and a figure, in severe classical style. It was moved as a result of a road scheme.

This would the people of Stourbridge would gather each November to lay poppy wreaths. It also commemorates those lost during World War 2.

Here you can get coffee and ice cream at the Coffee Lounge in Mary Stevens Park. To the right was some public toilets. Behind the cafe is the Stourbridge Council House (more details further down the post).

Red flowers on the flower bed near the gates that surrounds the Coffee Lounge.

You could also get some ice cream from this ice cream van.

This was the Mary Stevens Park Children's Play Area. Was a a few hoses firing water in the middle, and kids running into the water jets.

A look at the Bandstand. It was made of cast iron and was made by Hill & Smith Ltd. It was funded by Ernest Stevens. Meaning it dates to the late 1920s or early 1930s. It has been an important central feature to the park ever since it opened to the public. Summer band concerts have always been popular.

Outside the Stourbridge Council House in the gardens, is a bronze statue of Major Frank Foley (sitting on a bench). It was formerly known as Heath House and later Studley Court. During WW1 it was used as Studley Court Hospital. Studley Court was originally called Heath House. It was associated with Glassworks. The first reference on the site dates from 1691. Was a number of different owners of Heath House in the 19th century. It was run as a V.A.D. Military Hospital during the World War 1. And was a Convent School during the 1920s. It became the offices for what was then the Stourbridge District Council in the 1930s. It was used until Stourbridge merged with Dudley Borough in 1974. Since 1974, Studley Court has been home to parts of Dudley MBC.

The bronze statue of Major Frank Foley was unveiled on the 18th September 2018 by HRH The Duke of Cambridge (Prince William).

The sculptor was Andy De Comyn. Major Foley was a Black Country war hero. He saved thousands of Jews from Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War. 60 years after his death, his deeds have not been forgotten. More information here from the Express and Star.

There is a plaque on the bench which reads:

Major Frank Edward Foley CMG (1884 - 1958)
who lived in quiet retirement near this park
but in the 1930s helped over 10,000 Jewish people 
escape from the Holocaust, whilst working as 
British Passport Control Officer in Berlin.
He who saves one, saves the world.

Another look at the Stourbridge Council House from the second half of the garden. The Dudley Children Services Adoption Team uses part of the building now. Hard to believe that until 1929 this was a nunnery! It served as the Council House until Stourbridge became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley in 1974.

Now for a look around the lake, called the Heath Pool. It is to the south west corner of the park.

All the usual gulls and geese here. Plus there was a fountain in the middle of the lake.

Black-headed gulls perched on the top of these wooden poles.

The Heath Pool covers about less than one quarter of the park.

There was Canada geese all over. Some Coot as well.

Something I've not seen before this visit was this Muscovy duck. There was quite a few of them here.

This sign had a lot of information about the Heath Pool. Was close to the exit / entrance from Stanley Road and Norton Road.

This gate is the entrance and exit to Stanley Road.

After I left the park, heading back into town, I also saw this gate on Love Lane, from Heath Lane.

While I could have walked to Stourbridge Junction, I wanted one more ride of the Stourbridge Shuttle so walked back to the Stourbridge Interchange. See my post on my last ride here: West Midlands Railway Stourbridge Shuttle (July 2019).

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
70 passion points
Green open spaces
16 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Daisy Farm Park near the Maypole

A short walk away from the Maypole down Maypole Lane is Daisy Farm Park. It is quite small. It is also known as Daisy Farm Recreation Ground. Surrounded by houses on Highters Heath Lane, Gorleston Road and Prince of Wales Lane. The main path in the middle leads to Daisy Farm Road. Close to the Highters Heath and Warstock areas of south Birmingham. And not far from Yardley Wood and Shirley.

Related View community

Daisy Farm Park near the Maypole





A short walk away from the Maypole down Maypole Lane is Daisy Farm Park. It is quite small. It is also known as Daisy Farm Recreation Ground. Surrounded by houses on Highters Heath Lane, Gorleston Road and Prince of Wales Lane. The main path in the middle leads to Daisy Farm Road. Close to the Highters Heath and Warstock areas of south Birmingham. And not far from Yardley Wood and Shirley.


Daisy Farm Park

If you pop down to the Maypole for a coffee (back when it was OK to go to coffee shops), if you go to the Starbucks Drive Thru or Sainsbury's Cafe at the Maypole, when you leave and you want to walk somewhere, head along Maypole Lane until you get to Daisy Farm Park. It's quite small, so you may either walk past it, continuing on towards Solihull Lodge. If you head in up the path, and stick to the path, you will only be in there for a few minutes. Unless you have a walk around the fields here.

Daisy Farm Park, also known as Daisy Farm Recreation Ground is on the edge of the Billesley Ward in south Birmingham. There is a playground to the right of the main entrance. The car park is to the left.

 

2016

I first walked past Daisy Farm Park in December 2016, from Maypole Lane. I was walking towards Solihull Lodge.

The trees line down Maypole Lane just in front of the fence.

And old Birmingham City Council sign for Daisy Farm Park from the Department of Recreation and Community Services.

A brief look at the Daisy Farm Park Play Area.

The pavement on Maypole Lane that goes straight past Daisy Farm Park.

A gap in the fence before I passed the park, then went past the houses in Maypole Lane.

2019

In August 2019, after another one of my Maypole coffee stops (Starbucks), I walked down Maypole Lane, and this time headed through the gate into Daisy Farm Park.

The Daisy Farm Park Play Area on the right.

One of the elephant signs that all the parks in Birmingham has for their play areas. Such as here at Daisy Farm Park.

The entrance to the play area has this nice blue and orange gate with the Daisy Farm Park name at the top.

The car park and the field beyond to the left.

A basketball court and an area for teenagers to hang about.

So are teenage boys and girls just supposed to sit in this thing?

The path continues onto Daisy Farm Road and Gorleston Road.

There is another gate to the right which leads towards the estate at Prince of Wales Lane. Also near Maypole Grove.

Big open field to the left.

Some long grass, almost like hay to the right.

Was the odd blue bench along the path.

Looking back along the path towards Maypole Lane.

The gate at Daisy Farm Road.

After this I walked around the area until I caught a bus to Highgate Park. Some of my photos from that visit to Highgate Park are in this post here: Highgate Park: inner city park where the statue of Edward VII used to be.

I probably walked along Warstock Lane back to Alcester Road South and caught the no 50 bus at the time to Highgate.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
60 passion points
Transport
16 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Class 168 on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill to Leamington Spa

Chiltern Railways operates the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Moor Street) towards London Marylebone. Their main diesel multiple unit trains are the Class 168 Clubman. They do also use Class 68 with Mark 3 carriages, but here we will be looking at the Class 168 from Birmingham Snow Hill towards Leamington Spa. Stopping at Solihull and Warwick Parkway.

Related View community

The Class 168 on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill to Leamington Spa





Chiltern Railways operates the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Moor Street) towards London Marylebone. Their main diesel multiple unit trains are the Class 168 Clubman. They do also use Class 68 with Mark 3 carriages, but here we will be looking at the Class 168 from Birmingham Snow Hill towards Leamington Spa. Stopping at Solihull and Warwick Parkway.


I've not been on a train since lockdown came into force during late March 2020. Before then I went on the Chiltern Mainline from Solihull to Leamington Spa at the end of February 2020 (to go on the branch line to Coventry). The last time I went to Solihull Station in the middle of March 2020 was get some trains to Aston (to see the turnable in Eastside).

The photos below were taken between 2009 and early 2020.

Chiltern Railways have been running the Chiltern Railways franchise since 1996. The mainline is between Birmingham Snow Hill and London Marylebone. In late 2010, the terminus platforms 3 and 4 were restored to Birmingham Moor Street Station, and many Chiltern trains now terminate there.

The Class 168 Clubman DMU trains were built between 1998 and 2004. They were refurbished in 2007-8 and from 2013 onwards. There is 4 types of Class 168. The

  • 168/0 (built in 1998)
  • 168/1 (built in 2000)
  • 168/2 (built in 2004)
  • 168/3 (built in 2000 as Class 170 for TransPennine Express)

Birmingham Snow Hill Station

Seen at platform 2 during September 2013 was Chiltern Railways 168216. It would form a service to London Marylebone. Seen in it's new livery at Birmingham Snow Hill Station, while I was at platform 3.

Chiltern Railways 168002 had just arrived at platform 2 at Snow Hill Station during November 2014, having come from London Marylebone. One of the oldest trains in the fleet, in it's new livery.

Chiltern Railways 168217 was seen at platform 2 at Birmingham Snow Hill Station during May 2016. From my usual view from platform 3. In the new standard grey livery.

Seen inside of Birmingham Snow Hill Station at platform 2, during December 2017 was Chiltern Railways 168 329. It would form the Chiltern Mainline service to London Marylebone. This was one of the trains that Chiltern inherited from TransPennine Express, which used to be a Class 170, before it was converted.

Birmingham Moor Street Station

Seen at platform 4 at Birmingham Moor Street Station during November 2011, was Chiltern Railways 168108. Behind was Selfridges, the Rotunda and what used to be the Pavilions (which it was at the time). The old blue livery would last a few more years after this. These restored platforms opened at the end of 2010. Part of Chiltern's Evergreen 3 project (during Phase 1).

Chiltern Railways 168110 was seen at platform 4 during April 2015 in the new grey livery. The inside of these trains had been refurbished as well. Can just about see Selfridges from here.

Arriving at platform 3 at Birmingham Moor Street during December 2017 was Chiltern Railways 168004. In the new grey livery, but was looking a bit dirty at the time.

In January 2020 from platform 1 at Birmingham Moor Street. Chiltern Railways 168106 had just left Birmingham Snow Hill. And after a stop at Moor Street, was heading on it's way to it's next stop at Solihull, on it's way towards London Marylebone.

Solihull Station

Departing Solihull Station during May 2013 was Chiltern Railways 168216. At the front was also Chiltern Railways 172 103. It was heading to London Marylebone. In the old blue livery.

In December 2013, I was at Solihull Station when I saw Chiltern Railways 168108. It was heading for Birmingham Moor Street (which would be it's final stop and terminus).

In May 2016 at Solihull, I saw Chiltern Railways 168218 heading towards London Marylebone. It was a wet weekend, and this might have been a Wembley Special weekend (the FA Cup Final was that weekend at the time). I've been on a Chiltern train when it's been packed full of football fans going down to Wembley.

In July 2019 an unidentified Chiltern Railways Class 168 is seen crossing the Low Bridge on Blossomfield Road in Solihull. While a pair of buses cross under it towards Solihull Town Centre. I had just got off the no 6 bus, which was the red single decker bus on the right. The bus with NXWM was 1914. Landflight bus on the left was on the 8W.

Warwick Parkway Station

I got the train down from Solihull to Warwick in April 2019, and walked up the Grand Union Canal. Getting off near Warwick Parkway Station. This was my first time using the station, although I've passed through it many times in the past. Seen departing from Warwick Parkway for London Marylebone was Chiltern Railways 168 323 and 168 321.

Both Chiltern Railways 168 323 and 168 321 had been part of the former TransPennine Express fleet (it ended in 2016) that used to be Class 170, before they were refurbished and change to a Class 168/3.

After a wait at Warwick Parkway, Chiltern Railways 168 326 arrived at the station.

Chiltern Railways 168 326 would be my ride back to Solihull from Warwick Parkway. Sit in the Quiet Zone. It is so comfortable on these trains.

Leamington Spa Station

Back in October 2011, I got the train down to Leamington Spa Station for the first time for a photo walk around the town. Seen at the opposite platform was Chiltern Railways 168112. After stopping at Leamington Spa, it would resume it's journey down to London Marylebone.

In March 2018 on another visit to Leamington Spa Station, I saw Chiltern Railways 168108. This was the first time I had got a train from Coventry to Leamington, going past Kenilworth (which hadn't opened at the time). I would go back when Kenilworth Station opened for the first time. Meanwhile this Chiltern train was heading down to London Marylebone after a stop at Leamington Spa.

On Leap Year Day at the end of February 2020, I caught a packed Chiltern Railways train down to Leamington Spa from Solihull (heading to Coventry on the branch line). Got off before the train got too busy with football fans. Chiltern Railways 168215 seen heading on it's way down to London Marylebone. That day, Chiltern should have put two trains on of 8 carriages. But was only a crowded four carriages.

After I got back to Leamington Spa from Coventry (with Cross Country, as would have been a long wait for West Midlands Railway), Chiltern Railways 168003 arrived, and it would take me back to Solihull. Much quieter and less busier. This was the last time I travelled with Chiltern Railways before lockdown and the current restrictions.

From the 15th June 2020, if you travel on the train (or bus) you have to wear a mask over your mouth and nose. But travel is still "essential travel only". So I don't know when I'll be going on a train, or even a bus again (any time soon). Not been on either in 3 months now (since March 2020).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
50 passion points
Squares and public spaces
15 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square on the August Bank Holiday Monday 2019

On Monday 26th August 2019, I was changing buses from the 50 to 11A, when I spotted a Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square near All Saints Church, so went to check it out, before walking to the next 11A bus stop on the Vicarage Road. Was a variety of classic cars there that day. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday.

Related View community

The Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square on the August Bank Holiday Monday 2019





On Monday 26th August 2019, I was changing buses from the 50 to 11A, when I spotted a Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square near All Saints Church, so went to check it out, before walking to the next 11A bus stop on the Vicarage Road. Was a variety of classic cars there that day. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday.


Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square

Kings Heath Village Square opened in October 2011, and is suitable for any kind of event. During normal times, the square was available for hire. The square is at the corner of Vicarage Road and High Street in Kings Heath near All Saints Church.

On Monday the 26th August 2019, it was the August Bank Holiday Monday, and one such event was using the square. There was a Classic Car Meet on that day.

I had got off the no 50 bus and was going to switch to an 11A when I spotted this car meet and went to check it out before getting my bus home that day.

This view was taken from the 11A bus as it waited at the lights. Wythall Transport Museum were also having their usual Bank Holiday Weekend heritage bus rides up and down the Alcester Road. There was an old Metrobus to the right. Which I didn't notice until I first saw this photo on my computer.

When I first arrived I saw this Ford F 150 pick up truck, made in 1977. It originally came from Texas.

Another view of the Ford F150 from the 11A bus.

This is a Austin Six from 1929.

This Riley Elf was near the bushes close to Vicarage Road.

This old car was either a Rover 2000 or the Rover P6.

Various old cars near the All Saints Centre including the T48 Corsa Spyder.

A line of about 5 classic cars. The red car to the left was a 1977 Triumph Stag Mk II.

On the Labyrinth in the middle of the square at the time was this live band. With a drum kit and a guitar.

Close to All Saints Church was a 1966 Volvo Amazon.

The orange car with the boot open was a 1972 MGB GT.

Next up was this Volkswagen Type 2.

A classic Volkswagen Beetle

For a similar post click: Austin Seven's in Victoria Square (April 2012).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

Share  Connect with us
80 passion points

Top Contributors

Elliott Brown
PhotographyWeAre points: 11K
Combined FreeTimePays points: 61K
Daniel Sturley
PhotographyWeAre points: 7381
Combined FreeTimePays points: 51K
FreeTimePays
PhotographyWeAre points: 2515
Combined FreeTimePays points: 22K
Karl Newton
PhotographyWeAre points: 1520
Combined FreeTimePays points: 2910
Christine Wright
PhotographyWeAre points: 245
Combined FreeTimePays points: 2100

Show more